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I invented iPhone X Animoji Karaoke … You’re welcome, world

As I used a pre-release iPhone X this week, it suddenly occurred to me that it might be fun to lip-sync a song to an Animoji and have it mimic my performance. I dubbed the idea “Animoji Karaoke” and have been filling my Twitter feed with it. Judging from my likes, retweets, and comments, I … Continue reading “I invented iPhone X Animoji Karaoke … You’re welcome, world”

I invented iPhone X Animoji Karaoke … You’re welcome, world
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As I used a pre-release iPhone X this week, it suddenly occurred to me that it might be fun to lip-sync a song to an Animoji and have it mimic my performance. I dubbed the idea “Animoji Karaoke” and have been filling my Twitter feed with it. Judging from my likes, retweets, and comments, I haven’t just been entertaining myself; some people said that it redeemed Animoji or justifed buying a thousand-dollar phone. Even cynics have taken notice of my breakthrough.

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Both Mashable and The Verge have done stories on the idea, crediting me. And now that the iPhone X is on sale, other folks are creating their own clips and sharing them on Twitter. There’s even an @animojikaraoke Twitter feed, which I wish I had thought of first.

A few tips, should you choose to provide one of your new Animoji pals with your own dulcet tones:

  • After you’ve sent somebody an Animoji, you can use iOS’s standard sharing feature to save it as a video to your camera roll, thereby making it possible to upload it to Twitter and other venues.
  • To break through the Animoji feature’s 10-second limit, don’t record yourself inside the Messages app; instead, use iOS 11’s new screen-recording feature, which would even let you perform “Bohemian Rhapsody” in its entirety.
  • I brought two iPhone X videos into iMovie on a Mac to create my bunny-and-chicken duets. (Someone else has created the first Animoji quartet, and I have no idea how he did it).
  • You can record your soundtrack with the iPhone X’s microphone as you lip-sync, but I also used iMovie to lay in a higher-fidelity version of the audio, and lined it up with my lip movements in post-production.

About the author

Harry McCracken is the technology editor for Fast Company, based in San Francisco. In past lives, he was editor at large for Time magazine, founder and editor of Technologizer, and editor of PC World.

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