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P&G’s Olympic Moms Return, Uber Is Boxed In: Top 5 Ads Of The Week

Yeti somehow makes duck hunting emotional, SickKids goes all in on new fundraising, and Oxfam shows the scary side of tax loopholes.

P&G’s Olympic Moms Return, Uber Is Boxed In: Top 5 Ads Of The Week

P&G’s “Thank you, Mom” campaign first launched ahead of the 2010 Vancouver Winter Games. A pretty perfect piece of sports advertising. Little kids competing in Olympic events–hockey, skiing, speed skating, figure skating, bobsledding, and more–until the kicker shows us that’s just how their loving moms still see these phenomenal athletes. It’s evolved over time to show the struggle athletes go through to achieve their goals, and the journey their moms take with them all along the way. Over the last four summer and winter games, it’s been a gold medal in feelsvertising, and 2018 seems to be no exception. Only this time, it’s got a twist.

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For the upcoming Pyeongchang Games, P&G added inclusion into the conversation in the form of #Loveoverbias and–by featuring athletes of different races, gender, sexual orientation, and more–shows what a unifying thing sports can be. Onward!

P&G “Thank You, Mom: The Winter Olympics 2018”

What: The new brand spot for the Pyeongchang Games in P&G’s long-running “Thank You, Mom” Olympic campaign.

Who: P&G, Wieden+Kennedy Portland

Why we care: I like to think of myself as pretty hard-hearted when it comes to the emotional manipulation of advertisers, but every two years this damn campaign gets me right in the feels.

SickKids Foundation “SickKids VS All In”

What: Newest edition of the award-winning “VS” campaign for Toronto’s Sick Kids Hospital Foundation.

Who: SickKids Foundation, Cossette

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Why we care: The first iteration of this campaign won Cannes Lions and helped SickKids break fundraising record. Now, after the foundation has announced a $1.3 billion fundraising goal to build a new hospital, the campaign has more heavy lifting to do. The spot is well done, featuring about 200 real patients and their families and set to “I’ll Do Anything” from Oliver! In the past, the campaign followed the bombast of an anthem spot, with some hard-hitting emotional work, so I’m almost as interested in seeing what they’re planning to follow this one up with.

Yeti “Yeti Presents: SAM”

What: A new film in the “Yeti Presents . . . ” series, profiling the bond between two duck-hunting dogs and their owner.

Who: Yeti, Talweg Creative

Why we care: Regular readers will know I’m a sucker for the Yeti work, and how it manages to use small, intimate stories to make a larger emotional connection between people and the outdoors. I’ve never been duck hunting, I’ve never had a desire to go duck hunting, and I don’t understand duck hunting. But in “Sam,” I somehow found a way to identify with duck hunter Steve Koehly and the compelling relationship he has with his dogs.

Oxfam “The Heist No One Is Talking About”

What: A new PSA that uses a heist film story device to illustrate the effects of certain tax policies on society’s most in need.

Who: Oxfam Great Britain, Don’t Panic London

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Why we care: This spot is part of Oxfam’s campaign urging the U.K. government to implement tougher tax laws on British multinationals to help funnel to the world’s most needy some of the $100 billion in taxes that companies dodge in poor countries each year. This film is great in how it uses a movie theme we all know to show us the effects of corporate policy we may be unaware of.

Uber “Boxes”

What: A new ad for the transportation company in Asia that uses cardboard boxes to show the absurdity of traffic congestion.

Who: Uber, Forsman & Bodenfors

Why we care: Sometimes an ad is just a bit of fun. I can already hear the critics talking about how it doesn’t tie directly back to the brand enough with a classic kicker showing how Uber solves the problem. But that’s probably why I like it. I was almost cringing, waiting for some sort of thinking-outside-the-box tagline. Thankfully, it never arrived.

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About the author

Jeff Beer is a staff editor at Fast Company, covering advertising, marketing, and brand creativity. He lives in Toronto.

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