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From Bodega’s Apology To Working Smarter: This Week’s Top Leadership Stories

This week’s top stories take a close look at Bodega’s recent apology and consider a few habits you can adopt to work smarter, not harder.

From Bodega’s Apology To Working Smarter: This Week’s Top Leadership Stories

This week, one contributor teased out some lessons from the apology that Bodega cofounder Paul McDonald posted on Medium after the recent uproar. We also picked up some skills for how to be more efficient in your work life, as well as a reading list courtesy of Microsoft’s Satya Nadella.

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These are the stories you loved in Leadership for the week of September 18:

1.  Seven Lessons White People Can Learn From Bodega’s Apology

When we ran a story earlier this month about Bodega–the startup that wants to place mini-bar like containers in apartments and on street corners–the internet reacted swiftly and for the most part, negatively. Bodega soon published an apology on Medium, which wasn’t very well received, either. So this week Mike Su, chief product officer at the Latino-focused media company Mitú, shared his views on what that apology should’ve included.

2. This Is How To Actually Work Smarter, Not Harder

For many of us, the idea of working smarter without working harder may seem like an impossible pipe dream. But as Gwen Moran reports, it’s all about adopting small, consistent habits that can improve your working life–no need for a huge, ambitious overhaul. Here are a few of the best changes you can try making right away.

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3. The 7 Books Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella Says You Need To Lead Smarter

Nadella is a big reader. As he tells Fast Company‘s Harry McCracken, “Without books, I can’t live.”  He credits his approach to turning Microsoft around to some of the lessons he’s learned through deep reading in history, economics, technology, and management. One of Nadella’s top book recommendations: Nonviolent Communications by Marshall Goldberg. 

4. What Trader Joe’s Figured Out About Work Culture That My Past Employers Haven’t

For one former Trader Joe’s employee, the grocery store offered an even more supportive culture than the politicians’ offices and newspapers she’s worked for since. This week Hayley Benham-Archdeacon explained why the California chain left such a lasting impression on her as a teenager–and why it can actually be good to report to lots of middle managers. 

5. The Secret Meaning Behind Four Of The Most Common Interview Questions

Some of the most common interview questions might seem trite and annoying to answer, but there’a reason why recruiters and hiring managers keep asking them. As Fast Company’s Rich Bellis discovered this week, when you’re asked to describe your weaknesses, interviewers are likely testing your honesty and self-awareness. Here are some other insider clues into what an employer is really trying to figure out when they toss a cliché-sounding question at you.