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There’s a good chance your coworkers hate you

There’s a good chance your coworkers hate you
[Image: Kvarki1 via Wikimedia Commons]

Actually, they may dislike you so much that they want to quit. According to the results of Comparably‘s year-long survey of 36,000 workers across the technology sector–from  Amazon, Apple, Google, Facebook, and Uber to smaller VC-funded, privately-held startups–one in three people may be eyeing the door because of a coworker they can’t stand.

Among the most likely to be irritated enough to quit:

  • 43% of women
  • 32% of men
  • 46% of people in business-development roles
  • 45% of people in design roles

Seventy percent of workers under 25 and the same share of those over 56 aren’t terribly bothered by annoying colleagues, though. On the other hand, a solid 40% of those between the ages of 36 and 40–right at the peak of their career–are feeling the coworker-caused frustration. And the higher the level of education, the higher the irritation factor: 47% of PhDs vs. 26% of high-school diploma-holders say they’re considering quitting over bad blood in the office.

Work friendships might be one factor in these variations. Encouragingly, 51% of men and 55% of women reported having a work BFF, and research suggests that people who cultivate friendships at work are more productive and motivated to succeed.

Looking more closely, 57% of workers under 30–the age group that’s less likely to quit because of a bad colleague–say they have a close friend at work, the most of any age group. The under-25 set also like hanging out with their coworkers after hours; nearly a quarter (23%) do that every week. As workers get older, though, their chances of having work buddies to hang out with goes down.

The lesson? Keep your friends close, now and always.

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