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Here’s What Twitter Thought Of The First iPhone Back In 2007

To appreciate the hoopla of iPhone launch day, you had to be there. But if you weren’t–or have forgotten about it–read these tweets.

Here’s What Twitter Thought Of The First iPhone Back In 2007
[Photo: Flickr user Gadgetdude]

In June 2007, Twitter was 15 months old, and not yet a mainstream phenomenon. It was, however, developing a booming audience among the technorati. So when the first iPhone arrived at Apple Stores–still maybe the most-hyped moment in the history of consumer technology–it’s no shocker that it kind of took over Twitter.

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Thanks to Twitter’s advanced search feature, I was able to revisit the iPhone tweets that got posted on that day, and the memories came flooding back. (Of iPhone launch day, not Twitter–I had an account, but it was dormant at the time, and I didn’t really figure out Twitter until 2008.)

Among the chatter, I found a few folks live-tweeting their experiences buying an iPhone, something that would become a lot more common with later models. (I did it myself a year later.) Here’s a sampling of Tim Brunelle’s iPhone-buying tweets:

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And here are … well, just some random 6/29/07 iPhone tweets that struck my fancy. Note that they’re all purely text-based–skimming them reminded me that Twitter was a far less rich experience before it began embedding photos, videos, polls, and previews in article links.

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https://twitter.com/SoylentJames/status/126722222

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I’m grateful for the fancy Twitter search options that let me find these tweets, but they’re not that easy to use, and I sometimes wonder if I’m the only person who cares about them. (When I try to use them on my iPad, they not only don’t work, but I get a spurious error message about a nonexistent @search-advanced account.) In the years, decades, and even centuries to come, tweets will be an invaluable record of what the world thought about significant events as they happened; it would be great if that real-time historical record got easier to find and share.

About the author

Harry McCracken is the technology editor for Fast Company, based in San Francisco. In past lives, he was editor at large for Time magazine, founder and editor of Technologizer, and editor of PC World.

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