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  • 06.27.17

A pharma exec was sentenced to nine years in prison for profiting from a meningitis outbreak

A Massachusetts pharmacy executive at the center of a deadly meningitis outbreak was sentenced to nine years in prison on Monday for putting profits above safety.

A federal jury convicted Barry Cadden, the owner and head pharmacist of New England Compounding Center, of racketeering and fraud charges in connection with the outbreak, Reuters reports. Cadden was cleared of second-degree murder charges for the outbreak that killed 76 people in what the DOJ has called the largest public health crisis ever caused by a pharmaceutical product. The outbreak occurred when Cadden started to produce drugs in dangerously unsanitary conditions (moldy gloves! unlicensed pharmacist!) sending more than 17,000 vials of the steroid tainted across the country. The contaminated steroid, which was commonly prescribed for back pain, caused injury or death in some 778 people nationwide. According to the Washington Post, back in 2014, federal prosecutors filed a 131-count indictment against Cadden and 13 others, claiming they “operated more like a criminal enterprise than a pharmacy.” ML