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HoloLens is still for developers, developers, developers

More than a year ago, Microsoft started shipping a $3,000 developer version of its HoloLens mixed-reality headset. It’s still available. But no lower-cost consumer version has followed. And here at the Build developer conference, HoloLens’s creator, Alex Kipman, spoke of having shipped HoloLens last year as if making it available to developers had been the … Continue reading “HoloLens is still for developers, developers, developers”

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More than a year ago, Microsoft started shipping a $3,000 developer version of its HoloLens mixed-reality headset. It’s still available. But no lower-cost consumer version has followed. And here at the Build developer conference, HoloLens’s creator, Alex Kipman, spoke of having shipped HoloLens last year as if making it available to developers had been the goal rather than a milestone.

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Since unveiling HoloLens in January 2015, Microsoft has expended its vision for mixed reality and “holographic computing” to encompass devices made by other companies. At Build, it announced hand-controller technology that will be available in products such as a $399 Acer headset/controller bundle, which certainly counts as a consumer price point. But I still wonder: Will HoloLens itself ever ship in a more affordable, mass-market form?

About the author

Harry McCracken is the technology editor for Fast Company, based in San Francisco. In past lives, he was editor at large for Time magazine, founder and editor of Technologizer, and editor of PC World.

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