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  • 05.10.17

MIT researchers may have figured out a new way to rid our water of micro-pollutants

In case you didn’t know, our water is filled with so-called micro-pollutants, those super-tiny contaminants found in parts-per-million doses. But researchers at MIT have come up with a new method for cleaning them out.

As MIT explains, the process involves pushing polluted water between chemically treated surfaces that serve as positive and negative electrodes, which can bind strongly with a specific type of pollutant molecule. It’s basically a super-magnet that works on super-tiny chemical pollutants. This new method was found to be more effective, cheaper, and worked at lower voltage and lower pressure than other decontamination methods like membrane filtration, electrodialysis, and whatever “capacitive deionization” is, with fewer by-products. Using this new tech, researchers were able to rid water of ibuprofen and various pesticides down to parts-per-million concentrations. It still needs to be tested under real-world conditions (Flint, maybe?) but researchers have high hopes that they will be cleaning up water soon.

 ML