advertisement
advertisement

Facebook talks bringing connectivity everywhere it’s required

Many of us are now used to fairly decent internet connectivity on a regular basis. But we have to remember that there are plenty of people–and situations–where high-speed internet is nothing more than a dream. That’s why Facebook (as are others, like Google) is working on improving connectivity in as many places as possible.

Today at F8, its developers conference, the company revealed its latest progress–steps forward in high-speed connectivity for places with none at all, in cities, where buildings can interfere with signals, and in emergency situations. The company revealed it has set new records for wireless data transfer–36 gigabits per second over a distance of 13 kilometers using millimeter-wave technology and 80 gigabits per second using optical cross-link technology; and 16 gigabits per second from a fixed spot on the ground to an aircraft 7 kilometers away. Facebook also talked about a test in San Jose, California, in which it successfully demonstrated a city-scale mesh millimeter-wave system that delivers fiber-quality connectivity. And finally, it announced its Tether-tenna, a connectivity project for places dealing with emergencies like floods or earthquakes that can deliver internet from a wire connected to a helicopter. All of which, of course, means more access to Facebook.

advertisement
advertisement