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  • 02.10.17

America’s self-image is the worst it’s been since the Iraq war

A new national survey from Gallup finds that Americans believe the rest of the world sees the U.S. more unfavorably (57%) than favorably (42%), a reversal from a year ago, and their worst assessment of the country’s image in a decade. 

These results are from a Gallup survey conducted Feb. 1-5, about two weeks into Donald Trump’s presidency. The 42% favorable rating is one of the lowest since Gallup began asking this question in 2000 and may be attributable to the election of Trump, whose sometimes controversial statements and actions have rankled several world leaders. However, Americans’ perceptions of the image of the U.S. abroad were marginally worse in 2007, when 40% thought the world viewed the nation favorably. At the time, the U.S. was embroiled in wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and President George W. Bush was highly unpopular . . . The high-water mark for Americans believing the U.S. is viewed favorably was 79% in 2002, in the wake of the 9/11 terrorist attacks in the U.S.

Along with that rising dissatisfaction—a reflection of the administration’s rocky early days—is a growing demand for impeachment: Nearly half of Americans now support impeaching President Trump (46%), equal to those who oppose it (46%), according to another poll by Public Policy Polling of 712 registered voters on February 7 and 8 (53% of those surveyed disapprove of the president). Impeachment is far easier said than done, but it also seems to be where the money is: On one online betting site, bookies say the odds are more than 2 to 1 that the president will be impeached by the end of his first termAP