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With his latest bipartisan move, Mark Zuckerberg is making every effort not to piss off either side

Ever since last summer’s controversy over Facebook‘s trending team amid reports that editors were suppressing conservative news, Mark Zuckerberg has been doing all that he can to show his bipartisan bona fides. Soon after that scandal, he invited top conservatives to a peace summit and told them that he wants Facebook “to be a platform for all ideas.” During the election, he remained studiously agnostic about Donald Trump (aside from a brief reference to “fearful voices calling for building walls”), not contributing to any campaign, and even saying that he felt “hopeful” after watching the results on Election Night with his infant daughter.

Since the election, he’s continued to chart a path that’s calculated to be politically neutral—which doesn’t seem to have satisfied anyone. At first dismissive over the fake news furor, which enraged liberals simmering over Hillary Clinton’s loss, he eventually agreed to partner with some fact-checking organizations, which freaked out conservatives concerned about seeing their views stifled. 

Now, he’s trying to be as bipartisan as possible in his hiring. On Monday, he named former CNN anchor Campbell Brown to a newly created position as Head of News Partnerships, where she’ll serve as a liaison between Facebook and publishers. She’s well respected but is quite neutral, has annoyed both liberals with her support for charter schools, and upset conservatives by criticizing Trump during the campaign. And she’s married to a former Bush administration official.

Today, Zuckerberg continued this strategy, hiring former Obama adviser David Plouffe to join his charity effort, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, and to lead Facebook’s policy and advocacy effort. He also named former Republican National Committee chairman Ken Mehlman  to lead “our policy advisory board.” With these hires, Facebook now employs the politicos who helped win 3 of the last 4 presidential elections, notes Quartz.MB