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  • 12.20.16

These retailers are pledging to stop the practice of “on call” work shifts

Disney, Aeropostale, Carter’s, David’s Tea, PacSun, and Zumiez said Tuesday that they will stop requiring their retail employees to work “on call” shifts. The practice requires those employees to call in before a shift to determine whether they need to show up that day—something that often forces low-wage workers to keep a day open and arrange things like child care, only to discover that they don’t need to work and won’t even be compensated for their time.

On-demand work schedules have been shown to increase employee stress and impact things like the ability to pursue an education. Under pressure from employee-rights groups, some retailers have agreed to assign work schedules in advance. Last year, retailers including the Gap, Urban Outfitters, and Victoria’s Secret, made a similar pledge. But it’s unclear if the agreements will help retailers avoid new regulations. Legislators in New York City, for instance, recently proposed a package of bills that would force employers to set more regular schedules for low-wage workers.EP