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Vanity Fair contributor steps up hunt for Twitter troll who allegedly induced a seizure

Last week, journalist Kurt Eichenwald, who suffers from epilepsy, said a Twitter user tweeted a strobe-like image at him with the intent to induce a seizure. It worked, he claims. Now he says he’s working with law enforcement and Twitter to unmask the user’s identity.  Twitter agreed to an expedited order in our effort to locate … Continue reading “Vanity Fair contributor steps up hunt for Twitter troll who allegedly induced a seizure”

Last week, journalist Kurt Eichenwald, who suffers from epilepsy, said a Twitter user tweeted a strobe-like image at him with the intent to induce a seizure. It worked, he claims. Now he says he’s working with law enforcement and Twitter to unmask the user’s identity

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A Twitter spokesman told me the company doesn’t comment on individual accounts or confirm investigations. The company has mechanisms by which authorities can request nonpublic information through a valid legal process such as a subpoena or court order. Twitter also releases transparency reports twice a year that show how many information requests it gets and how many it complies with. 

Eichenwald’s case raises some interesting legal questions in terms of potential criminal liability. Can tweets be seen as literal weapons?

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About the author

Christopher Zara is a senior staff news editor for Fast Company and obsessed with media, technology, business, culture, and theater. Before coming to FastCo News, he was a deputy editor at International Business Times, a theater critic for Newsweek, and managing editor of Show Business magazine

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