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  • 12.15.16

These organizations are going to help Facebook identify fake news

Amid the recent outcry over fake news, specifically fake news stories that plagued the 2016 election, Poynter has established the International Fact-Checking Network. The nonpartisan group believes that “transparent fact-checking can be a powerful instrument of accountability journalism; conversely, unsourced or biased fact-checking can increase distrust in the media and experts while polluting public understanding.”

Now, Facebook has made signing this fact-checking code a condition for being accepted as a third-party fact checker on its site. As part of a new feature, when a fact checker disputes a story and flags it, Facebook users will be told its accuracy has been “disputed” prior to being able to share it—an attempt at cutting down on the spread of misinformation. Publications can register to be part of the fact-checking group if they agree to abide by a code of principles and will produce a public report each year detailing to the public how they’ve lived up to those ideals. 

Approved fact checkers currently include Snopes, Politifact, the Washington Post Fact Checker, ABC News, and more. You can check out the full list of 43 fact-checking groups on Poynter’s website.EP