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Twitter mourns Vine after killing it

Vine has been marked for death. Four years after buying the short-form video-sharing app, Twitter announced today that it’s discontinuing Vine. What this means for creators who built huge audiences (sometimes leading to TV careers and other success) and social media startups that piggybacked on those audiences isn’t clear. But judging from the sentiment on Twitter, … Continue reading “Twitter mourns Vine after killing it”

Vine has been marked for death. Four years after buying the short-form video-sharing app, Twitter announced today that it’s discontinuing Vine.

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What this means for creators who built huge audiences (sometimes leading to TV careers and other success) and social media startups that piggybacked on those audiences isn’t clear. But judging from the sentiment on Twitter, lots of people are pretty bummed. 

After a buzzworthy launch in 2012, Vine saw its usage ravaged by the launch of video-sharing on Instagram and the bleeding likely wasn’t helped by the rise of apps like Snapchat and Musical.ly. 

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About the author

John Paul Titlow is a writer at Fast Company focused on music and technology, among other things. Find me here: Twitter: @johnpaul Instagram: @feralcatcolonist

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