advertisement
advertisement

Goodbye, Google Apps—hello, G Suite 

For a decade, Google has offered a suite of apps—including Gmail, Google Docs, Google Sheets, and a lot more—aimed at business users. It started out calling the combined offering “Google Apps for Your Domain” and later renamed it “Google Apps for Work.” Today, at its enterprise-focused Horizon conference in San Francisco, the company announced that it’s … Continue reading “Goodbye, Google Apps—hello, G Suite “

advertisement
advertisement

For a decade, Google has offered a suite of apps—including Gmail, Google Docs, Google Sheets, and a lot more—aimed at business users. It started out calling the combined offering “Google Apps for Your Domain” and later renamed it “Google Apps for Work.”

advertisement
advertisement

Today, at its enterprise-focused Horizon conference in San Francisco, the company announced that it’s going to refer to its suite as a suite: “G Suite,” to be exact. The new name is meant to convey the integrated and collaborative nature of the productivity tools it encompasses.

Beyond the shift in branding, Google is rolling out some new features for the apps that make up G Suite, such as:

• Calendar is getting a feature that intelligently finds available blocks of time for group meetings, based on what it knows about each user’s scheduling habits. 

• Team Drives is a collaboration-focused version of Google Drives.

• The Hangouts videoconferencing service will give every session a phone dial-in for folks who can’t do video.

• Search and Assist offers work-oriented, Google Now-style features such as the ability to proactively show you documents you need for a meeting on your schedule.

About the author

Harry McCracken is the technology editor for Fast Company, based in San Francisco. In past lives, he was editor at large for Time magazine, founder and editor of Technologizer, and editor of PC World.

More