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Study finds that fitness trackers hinder weight loss. Wait, what?

A study conducted at the University of Pittsburg found that people who used a fitness tracker lost less weight than a similar group that didn’t. The study focused on 471 participants between 18 and 35 years old, and with a body mass index (BMI) of between 25% and 40%. The participants were divided into two … Continue reading “Study finds that fitness trackers hinder weight loss. Wait, what?”

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A study conducted at the University of Pittsburg found that people who used a fitness tracker lost less weight than a similar group that didn’t. The study focused on 471 participants between 18 and 35 years old, and with a body mass index (BMI) of between 25% and 40%. The participants were divided into two groups. Both groups reduced food intake, increased exercise, and got counseling. Only one group was given a fitness tracker—a BodyMedia FIT Core—to monitor their food and exercise. The group without the fitness tracker lost 2.4 kg (around 5 lb.) more over a 24-month period.

See the full study in the Journal of the American Medical Association. 

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About the author

Fast Company Senior Writer Mark Sullivan covers emerging technology, politics, artificial intelligence, large tech companies, and misinformation. An award-winning San Francisco-based journalist, Sullivan's work has appeared in Wired, Al Jazeera, CNN, ABC News, CNET, and many others.

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