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Riding in Uber’s self-driving car is pretty boring

Today, Uber began picking up some Pittsburgh passengers in a handful of automated cars (each manned by a “safety engineer” in the driver’s seat) as part of a pilot project. It also invited a handful of journalists along for the ride. Their consensus: It’s pretty boring. From Washington Post reporter Brian Fung: “In a word, … Continue reading “Riding in Uber’s self-driving car is pretty boring”

Today, Uber began picking up some Pittsburgh passengers in a handful of automated cars (each manned by a “safety engineer” in the driver’s seat) as part of a pilot project. It also invited a handful of journalists along for the ride. Their consensus: It’s pretty boring.

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From Washington Post reporter Brian Fung: “In a word, things felt normal. Mundane, even.”

TechCrunch reporter Signe Brewster: “If they are anything like me, they will respond with fascination followed by boredom.”

NPR reporter Liz Reid: “The ride feels pretty much like a ride in any other car—with an extremely cautious driver. We go maybe one or two miles an hour over the speed limit. Turns in particular feel painfully slow.”

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All of this boredom is more of an endorsement than a criticism. When it comes to moving from point A to point B safely, uneventfulness is exactly the quality for which most people aim.

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About the author

Sarah Kessler is a senior writer at Fast Company, where she writes about the on-demand/gig/sharing "economies" and the future of work.

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