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  • 08.23.16

Is WikiLeaks no longer an institution that stands up for an individual’s right to privacy?

It was once seen as a democratizing tool that allowed the masses to be made aware of anti-privacy and other transgressions committed by those in power, but lately public opinion about WikiLeaks is on the wane as the site inadvertently exposes more personal information about people outside of the public eye in its data dumps, reports the Associated Press:

In the past year alone, the radical transparency group has published medical files belonging to scores of ordinary citizens while many hundreds more have had sensitive family, financial or identity records posted to the web. In two particularly egregious cases, WikiLeaks named teenage rape victims. In a third case, the site published the name of a Saudi citizen arrested for being gay, an extraordinary move given that homosexuality is punishable by death in the ultraconservative Muslim kingdom.

The AP isn’t the only one to take notice of how WikiLeaks has gone from exposing violations against people’s privacy to exposing private details of a person’s life. Fast Company recently ran the story How WikiLeaks Has Changed: From Whistleblower To Weapon, which chronicles how the organization appears to have grown more partisan, and more eager to boost impact by pegging releases to events in the news.MG