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Beer bottles will soon include calorie counts

No longer is ignorance bliss. The Beer Institute is setting new labeling standards and has asked beer companies to disclose “calorie, carbohydrate, protein, fat and alcohol by volume information” along with freshness dates and lists of ingredients on labels, boxes, and accompanying websites. Surprisingly, companies comprising more than 81% of all beer volume sold in the … Continue reading “Beer bottles will soon include calorie counts”

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No longer is ignorance bliss. The Beer Institute is setting new labeling standards and has asked beer companies to disclose “calorie, carbohydrate, protein, fat and alcohol by volume information” along with freshness dates and lists of ingredients on labels, boxes, and accompanying websites. Surprisingly, companies comprising more than 81% of all beer volume sold in the U.S. have agreed to comply with the new standards, including:

• Anheuser-Busch

• MillerCoors

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• HeinekenUSA

• Constellation Brands Beer Division

• North American Breweries 

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• Craft Brew Alliance

The new labeling will roll out slowly between now and 2020. As NPR points out, this information may prove a shock to consumers. Heavy beers like stouts can claim 200 or even 300 calories per serving. Drink two beers and you’ve had a whole meal worth of calories—so enjoy the knowledge poverty while it lasts. 

[Photo: Flickr user Arturo Pardavila III]

About the author

Ruth Reader is a writer for Fast Company. She covers the intersection of health and technology.

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