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  • 06.30.16

Fertility apps: Most are not all that reliable, study finds 

The world of mobile health was once described as a “Wild, Wild West.” But now, researchers are starting to publish papers on the reliability and efficacy of these apps in almost every category from mental health to dermatology.

The latest research, published in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, found some major problems with dozens of fertility apps that claim to track the days each month when women are most or least likely to get pregnant. Most of these apps don’t use evidence-based methods to measure and predict when a woman will be most fertile. And most failed to accurately track fertile days without false negatives. 

Dr. Marguerite Duane, an adjunct associate professor at the Georgetown University School of Medicine, advised women who are trying to get pregnant – or avoid it – to seek advice from a medical expert before using one of these apps. Users can also review the apps on this website as of July 7, which was created in conjunction with the study. CF