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Apple’s AI is big, broad, and bad

There’s an important theme emerging here at WWDC. Without saying so explicitly, Apple is answering the charge that it is behind on AI. We’ve seen improvements to Siri, which will answer deeper questions than before and can control your Mac, too. Apple Maps will anticipate where you want to go, based on events in your … Continue reading “Apple’s AI is big, broad, and bad”

There’s an important theme emerging here at WWDC. Without saying so explicitly, Apple is answering the charge that it is behind on AI. We’ve seen improvements to Siri, which will answer deeper questions than before and can control your Mac, too. Apple Maps will anticipate where you want to go, based on events in your calendar and online. The Photos app will group photos in logical ways for you, rather than just offering an ungainly catalog. 

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The result is that from your car (CarPlay) to your home (where your Apple TV knows your preferences) to your computing on all your devices, Apple’s AI is trying to help. Contrast that to Amazon’s Echo, which is wonderful but is a single device tapping into a limited number of apps. And while Google Now is cool, Google doesn’t coordinate its apps nearly as well as Apple. More and more, we are seeing a company expanding its fundamental experience in ways that are user-friendly and ambitious. My takeaway from this keynote: Apple is reasserting the fact that it is the most you-centric company in tech.

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About the author

Rick Tetzeli is Editor At Large of Fast Company, which he joined in June 2010. Prior to that he ran and conceived Time Inc’s Assignment Detroit, in which Time, Fortune, Sports Illustrated, Money, CNNMoney.com, Essence and other Time Inc properties all combined to cover the troubled city and region intensely for a year

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