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Alphabet’s carpooling service won’t vet drivers

On Monday Alphabet announced it will pilot a new carpooling app in San Francisco. Workers at certain companies can now join a carpool to or from their offices with users of Alphabet’s navigation app, Waze, at the cost of 54 cents a mile (all of that money goes directly to the driver, at least during … Continue reading “Alphabet’s carpooling service won’t vet drivers”

On Monday Alphabet announced it will pilot a new carpooling app in San Francisco. Workers at certain companies can now join a carpool to or from their offices with users of Alphabet’s navigation app, Waze, at the cost of 54 cents a mile (all of that money goes directly to the driver, at least during the pilot phase).

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In a potentially controversial move, Alphabet has no plans to vet drivers with a background check. Ride-hailing companies like Lyft and Uber require background checks, but they have come under fire for not requiring fingerprints. In a carpooling context–Alphabet plans to limit drivers to two rides, one to work and one home, to avoid professional use of the app–should the bar be set even lower?

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About the author

Sarah Kessler is a senior writer at Fast Company, where she writes about the on-demand/gig/sharing "economies" and the future of work.

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