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Office drug tests are making it harder to fill jobs

Both workplace drug testing and drug usage are on the rise in the U.S. As a result, employers are having a harder time hiring people. Depending on your perspective, we need to do something about the drugs–or perhaps just the testing. 

Indeed, it might seem odd that workplace drug testing remains so prevalent in 2016, when only seven U.S. states fully and explicitly ban marijuana, the most common culprit. Most states allow it for recreational or medicinal uses. But apparently, occasionally ripping a bong and watching Comedy Central in one’s free time is still verboten in many U.S. workplaces. 

The U.S. started drug-testing many of its employees in the mid-1980s as part of the Reagan administration’s “War on Drugs.” As the U.S. gradually reconsiders its drug policies–seldom considered a stunning success–it remains to be seen if office drug testing will remain as common as it is today. JPT