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More proof that the world doesn’t need that many meal-delivery startups

San Francisco-based startup Kitchit is shutting down, reports TechCrunch‘s Megan Rose Dickey. The company sent an on-demand chef to your home to prepare dinner in your own kitchen—which made it extremely similar to New York’s Kitchensurfing, which folded earlier this month. In March, SpoonRocket, which delivered freshly-prepared meals, also met its demise. The increasing death … Continue reading “More proof that the world doesn’t need that many meal-delivery startups”

San Francisco-based startup Kitchit is shutting down, reports TechCrunch‘s Megan Rose Dickey. The company sent an on-demand chef to your home to prepare dinner in your own kitchen—which made it extremely similar to New York’s Kitchensurfing, which folded earlier this month. In March, SpoonRocket, which delivered freshly-prepared meals, also met its demise.

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The increasing death toll for on-demand meal startups doesn’t mean that the whole concept is doomed: San Francisco’s Postmates, which picks up food at restaurants and brings it to your door, is reportedly doing even better than we knew. But as with many startup categories, it may turn out that only the strongest of the field survive. And the safest bets may be those companies that—like Postmates—keep their costs and logistics in check by not actually trying to prepare the meals themselves.

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About the author

Harry McCracken is the technology editor for Fast Company, based in San Francisco. In past lives, he was editor at large for Time magazine, founder and editor of Technologizer, and editor of PC World.

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