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  • 04.01.16

Researchers believe they’ve discovered “anti-memories”

And they help control the electrical activity in our brain. Oxford University scientists says that processes in our brain mute the runaway electrical impulses our regular memories generate, without affecting the memory itself.  In a paper published in the journal Neuron, the researchers explain that a regular memory is, at its most basic, an electrical connection between two neurons in the brain. However, if this were the only factor at play, eventually the cumulative electrical activity in our brain from all our memories would cause electrical overload.

More research is needed into anti-memories in humans, but if they are confirmed their discovery could lead to new treatments for conditions such as schizophrenia, which is believed to be derived from electrical activity in the brain gone haywire. (by Michael Grothaus)MB