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In Its New Factory, Impossible Foods Will Make 12 Million Pounds Of Plant-Based Burgers A Year

The exciting new plant-based burger that bleeds like real meat is scaling up to reach more customers: It wants to be in 1,000 restaurants by the end of the year.

In Its New Factory, Impossible Foods Will Make 12 Million Pounds Of Plant-Based Burgers A Year
Photo: courtesy Impossible Foods Photo: courtesy Impossible Foods

Inside a former baked-goods factory near the Oakland airport, a construction crew is installing giant vats that will soon be used to scale up production of the Impossible Burger–a plant-based meat designed to look and taste good enough that meat eaters will want to order it, not vegetarians.

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The “meat,” developed by a team led by former Stanford biochemistry professor Patrick Brown, is currently being produced in a 10,000-square-foot pilot facility in Silicon Valley and a 1,500-square foot space in New Jersey. The new facility, at around 60,000 square feet, will dramatically scale up production capacity. When the factory is fully ramped up, it will be able to produce at least 1 million pounds of Impossible Burger meat a month, or 250 times more than today.

Photo: courtesy Impossible Foods

“It will enable us to go from something that is scarce–and we’re constantly getting complaints from customers about the fact that they can’t buy them at their local restaurant–and start to make it ubiquitous,” Brown said at an event launching the new factory.

The burger is currently available at 11 restaurants, including 3 that launched it on March 23. But by the end of the year, the company expects to supply 1,000 restaurants. It just signed a deal to have the burgers featured in the San Francisco Giant’s baseball stadium.

Photo: courtesy Impossible Foods

For the company, achieving scale is a critical part of achieving its mission. Brown started working on the project while thinking about the problem of climate change; raising cows and other animals for meat is one of the world’s largest sources of greenhouse gases. It also uses and pollutes more water than any other industry, and drives deforestation. But he realized that the majority of the world wouldn’t voluntarily go vegetarian for those reasons.

“Billions of people around the world who love meat are not going to stop demanding it, so we just have to find a better way to produce it,” he says.

Photo: courtesy Impossible Foods

The team studied the properties of meat–particularly heme, the molecule that makes blood red and gives meat a meaty taste–and then experimented with recreating those properties using only ingredients from plants.

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“When you think about meat, there’s the muscle, there’s the connective tissue, there’s the fat, so we had to figure out how to mimic those parts of beef to figure out how to experience the texture, but also the taste,” Don DeMasi, senior vice president of engineering for Impossible Foods, tells Fast Company.

The result looks like it was made from a cow, not plants. The handful of chefs who were given first access to the product say they think of it as meat. “It kind of made this transition in my mind to be–it’s just another kind of meat,” says chef Traci Des Jardins, who has been serving Impossible burgers at her San Francisco restaurant Jardinière for about a year, and now is also serving it at Public House, her restaurant at the city’s ballpark.

Photo: courtesy Impossible Foods

Before it’s cooked, the product is red like raw beef; as it cooks, it browns. As the heme mixes with juices and oozes out, it can look like it’s bleeding. “You’re seeing the exact same cooking chemistry that you see in meat, literally,” says Brown.

As the company scales up its beef alternative, it will focus on restaurants. In a year, it says, U.S. restaurants serve more than 5 billion pounds of burgers, and Impossible wants its 12 million pounds to be among them. Retail will come later, along with other products that are currently in development, such as poultry and steak.

“Our long-term goal is to basically develop a new and better way to create all the foods we make from animals,” says Brown.

About the author

Adele Peters is a staff writer at Fast Company who focuses on solutions to some of the world's largest problems, from climate change to homelessness. Previously, she worked with GOOD, BioLite, and the Sustainable Products and Solutions program at UC Berkeley.

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