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From Googlers’ Habits To Giving Up Gluten: This Week’s Top Leadership Stories

This week’s stories may help you ditch gluten, write better emails, and pick up some productivity tips from Google and Apple employees.

This week we learned what can happen when you cut gluten, sugar, dairy, and coffee from your diet, how to write emails other people don’t hate, and why employees at companies like Google and Apple are so much more productive.

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These are the stories you loved in Leadership for the week of March 12:

1. What Happened When I Gave Up Gluten, Sugar, Dairy, And Coffee

Sometimes it takes a detox to get our bodies and minds back on track. One writer felt this need at the beginning of 2017 after noticing that her holiday diet was leaving her constantly sluggish and tired. Despite encountering some initial difficulties, here’s why she ultimately decided to stick with it.

2. Why Employees At Apple And Google Are More Productive

There’s a reason why the likes of Apple, Google, and Netflix produce such great products and services: their employees. Not only do these companies have great people working for them, but they also know how to utilize their high performers. This week we found out how top tech firms’ star employees drive greater output and higher profit margins.

3. Six Ways To Write Emails That Don’t Make People Silently Resent You

When writing emails, it can be tough to strike the right tone. Too long and formal and it can waste the receiver’s time, while too short and succinct and it can sound disrespectful. Since we’re hardwired to interpret email negatively, paying close attention to phrasing is very crucial. Here’s how.

4. Why This CEO Appointed An Employee To Change Dumb Company Rules

In a company’s lifetime, some of the rules that need to be implemented during the startup period stop serving their purpose as the business grows. The CEO of Hootsuite came up with a creative solution after finding out how much time was being wasted on simple tasks–like chasing down approvals to spend $15 on a T-shirt.

5. How Trello Employees Use Trello

Trello brands itself as a trusted visual collaboration tool, so it’s no surprise that the company uses its own products to manage employees’ own workflow. Trello’s cofounder and head of product Michael Pryor shares how his employees put Trello boards to creative use, from organizing slide decks to introducing newcomers to projects.

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