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From Audi To Zoox, 17 Companies That Are Driving Change In The Car Industry

Along with GM, these innovators are finding ways to improve the basics of modern transportation.

From Audi To Zoox, 17 Companies That Are Driving Change In The Car Industry

Building a Tesla Model S

[Photo: Dominik Asbach]

Old-guard car manufacturers

Audi: In 2015, started test-driving an AI-laden prototype nicknamed "Jack" that lets drivers easily switch to autonomous mode via buttons on the wheel

BMW: Has promised an entirely autonomous car called iNext by 2021; BMW’s ReachNow car-sharing service launched in April in Seattle and expanded to Portland, Oregon, in September

Ford: Announced plans for fully autonomous car with no pedals or steering wheel by 2021; recently invested $75 million in California laser-sensor company Velodyne; bought San Francisco–based private bus service Chariot and plans to expand it

Volvo: Forged partnerships with Microsoft (will incorporate HoloLens augmented-reality technology into its cars) and Uber (which is planning to use Volvos as part of its self-driving test fleet in Pittsburgh); teamed up with safety-system-maker Autoliv to set up a new company focused on autonomous-driving software

Tech Giants

Alphabet: Launched self-piloting-car project back in 2009; testing retrofitted Lexus SUVs and its own adorable prototype vehicles in several locations; recently partnered with Fiat Chrysler to build self-driving minivans

Google’s self-driving prototype.[Photo: Brooks Kraft LLC/Getty Images]

Apple: Has invested $1 billion in Chinese ride-share company Didi Chuxing; reportedly rebooting its efforts to develop an Apple car; might also build a system to add autonomous features to preexisting vehicles

Baidu: Chinese search-engine company has teamed up with digital-graphics pioneer Nvidia to create a self-driving-vehicle system that uses 3-D maps in the cloud; is in the testing stage with several different self-driving-car prototypes, including one built with BMW

Tesla: After revolutionizing electric vehicles with the semi-autonomous Model S, will release more-affordable all-electric Model 3, possibly in late 2017; Model S’s involved in a pair of high-profile fatal accidents

In-Demand Providers

Didi Chuxing: Acquired Uber’s Chinese operations in August, ending a fierce rivalry for Chinese market

Lyft: Partnered with GM to start testing autonomous Chevy Bolt taxis within the next year

Uber: In September, began testing autonomous Ford Fusions in Pittsburgh—the first self-driving fleet available to the public in the U.S.

A fleet of Uber’s autonomous cars.[Photo: Angelo Merendino/Getty Images]

Startups

Comma.ai: Andreessen Horowitz–backed company making an inexpensive kit that turns regular cars into semi-autonomous ones

Mobileye: Israeli software maker that had partnered with Tesla to provide chips and software, but the two companies ended their collaboration in the wake of a fatal accident in May (Tesla cars currently still use Mobileye chips); has teamed up with Delphi Automotive to build a self-driving system by 2019

NextEV: Shanghai-based electric-car innovator headed in the U.S. by former Cisco exec Padmasree Warrior; set to show off a high-performance all-electric sports-car prototype this year

Nutonomy: Born at MIT and backed by Ford, makes self-driving cars, software, and autonomous robots; started testing driverless taxis in Singapore this summer

Quanergy: Silicon Valley–based company developing light- and object-sensing technology for self-driving cars; boasts $1.59 billion valuation thanks to investors Samsung and Delphi

Zoox: Palo Alto startup behind the Boz, a fully autonomous concept vehicle (still in the design phase) with inward-facing seats similar to a train car; company valued at around $1 billion

A version of this article appeared in the November 2016 issue of Fast Company magazine.

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