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Today in Tabs

Media Tabs: What If Twitter, But Even More So?

10,000 characters but 9,999 of them are white.

Media Tabs: What If Twitter, But Even More So?

[Source photo: Flickr user a_flash_frame]

A couple days ago Mashable started a rumor that the microblogging service Twitter was going to go macro and raise its notorious character limit from 140 to 10,000. The company’s stock dropped almost 3% that day, presumably due to trading algorithms programmed to sell whenever "Twitter" appears in the news, since Twitter hasn’t made a good product decision in living memory. Jack Dorsey stopped the bleeding with a text screenshot explaining the idea, which is just to replace text screenshots with regular text that you can then screenshot and share elsewhere. The cryonically suspended brain of John Herrman emitted a new Content Wars essay about all this, and thank goodness Choire continues to pay his cold-pac fees. His conclusion is that this is Twitter’s shot at taking on Facebook’s Instant Articles, albeit in a characteristically janky Twitterish way.

Twitter did just restore Politwoops’s API access, reminding everyone that they had revoked it. And the company’s Sideshow-Bob-walking-into-a-circle-of-rakes effort at corporate diversity continues, with the hiring of a new diversity VP who is… a white man. The Nation has some good dirt on who at Twitter even acts like they care about diversity (@jack) and who doesn’t (@dickc).

Pinterest is doing somewhat better on diversity. The most recent episode of the Startup podcast was about diversity in hiring from both the hirers and the hirees. And Facebook might as well be operating on a different planet entirely. It’s currently embroiled in a fight with countries like India and Egypt over whether it will be allowed to give away free but very limited internet data services there.

Also in Media: Vox Media’s pissroach emergency was resolved with minimal loss of life. And Gawker’s executives have some very strange ideas about what it means to have a union.

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