advertisement
advertisement

These Are The Best Colleges For Future Female Entrepreneurs

Out of the 14,341 startups funded in the last five years, about 2,226 had at least one female founder. Here’s where they went to college.

Though many of the skills entrepreneurs need to succeed aren’t usually taught in a classroom—taking risks, sales experience, and just basic fearlessness—more colleges are developing curriculums to help breed startup founders. After all, starting a company a few years after college is the new law or medical degree. And women are really driving this movement—they’re graduating from some of the top schools in the nation.

advertisement

[Related: 8 Best Colleges For Budding Feminists]

According to new data from CrunchBase, out of the 14,341 American-based startups launched between 2009 and 2014 that received funding, about 15.5%, or 2,226 of those businesses had at least one female founder.

The data also analyzed 3,616 female founders and looked at which colleges and universities were producing the most. So who came out on top? Stanford University headed up the list with 236. Some notable alums include Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes (who dropped out), Polyvore cofounder Jess Lee, and Levo’s own CEO Caroline Ghosn. Here are the rest of the top-producing schools:

  • Harvard University (235 of recent female entrepreneurs are alumni)
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology (127 of recent female entrepreneurs are alumni)
  • University of California, Berkeley (105 of recent female entrepreneurs are alumni)
  • Columbia University (105 of recent female entrepreneurs are alumni)
  • University of Pennsylvania (103 of recent female entrepreneurs are alumni)

In 2009, only about 9.5% of startups had at least one female founder. In 2014, the percentage jumped to 18%, proving that these programs and focus are working. This is especially impressive considering that it’s usually harder for women to secure venture capital funding. But it may help to combat these hardships if aspiring entrepreneurs can start pursuing their goals as early as the age of 18.

[Related: Are Startup Schools The New MBA Alternative?]

This article originally appeared on Levo and is reprinted with permission.

advertisement

Video