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Sex Tech Startup Wants Men To Do Their Kegels

The bicycle seat–shaped kGoal Boost gadget turns pelvic-floor exercises into a game.

The health benefits of pelvic floor exercises, known as Kegels, for women have long been extolled. Turns out men—yes, men—should be strengthening their weak muscles, too. The sexual health startup Minna Life invented the kGoal Boost to turn Kegels for men into a game.

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Minna Life is best known for creating a device and an app that help women strengthen their pelvic floor. It garnered an honorable mention in Fast Company‘s 2015 Innovation by Design Awards and has been met with plenty of consumer approval. Now the company wants to turn its attention to men.

Unlike the kGoal for women, which is used internally, the kGoal Boost is external. With their clothes on, users sit on the device then simultaneously flex their muscles like they would to stop the flow of urine and from passing gas. The pressure compresses the air-filled sensor pad, which communicates with the accompanying app to monitor how strongly the exercise was performed.

Minna Life cites research showing that pelvic floor exercises for men improves blood flow, bladder control, erection performance, and orgasm quality and control. Studies have also shown that it’s a treatment for erectile dysfunction.

“We’re pretty confident in saying that it will immediately become the second most fun thing you can do with your pelvic floor,” Minna Life says on its Kickstarter.

The cushy, air-filled blue elephant in the room wants to ask, is this all necessary? Do people really need an app to tell them how and when to squeeze their pee muscles? While the female version of the kGoal is compact and discrete—it fits in the palm of your hand—the male version has more, shall we say, presence. It’s tough to imagine a person towing this around the office to get in those reps. But should you bravely carry one of these and encounter scrutiny, you can always say it’s helping you train for a century since it’s a dead ringer for a padded bike seat.

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The early-bird price is $75 per unit and retail is expected to be $99.

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About the author

Diana Budds is a New York–based writer covering design and the built environment.

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