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Infographic: Take a Literary Look At All The Fictional Books Depicted In Fiction

Infographic: Take a Literary Look At All The Fictional Books Depicted In Fiction

One of the laziest ways to end a movie or a book is with the main character making a movie or a book about the events we’ve just seen. (A particularly egregious example is the end of Owen Wilson face-palmer, You, Me, and Dupree, every DVD of which should be buried deep within an active volcano.) However, the movies and books depicted in movies and books aren’t just the actual flesh-and-blood writer’s shortcut to a character’s self-actualization. Some of them are just fascinating reflections of the world with the piece or the characters who populate it. (A particularly enlightening example is the beginning of Owen Wilson smile-generator, The Royal Tenenbaums.) A new infographic brings together a wealth of such fake books.

Recently, we’ve seen all manner of similar round-ups that offer up the most prominent fictional tickets, fictional sentient robots, fictional weapons, and fictional booze. It seems as though we’re perfectly on schedule to examine the library racks full of fictional fiction.

Created by the team at MyPrint 24/7, Fiction’s Greatest Fiction is kind of a misnomer. While all the titles mentioned in the infographic are fictional, as in they don’t truly exist, many of them would be classified as nonfiction within their worlds. (Nobody is reading Gray’s Sports Almanac from Back To The Future II on the beach.) That small gripe aside, there’s plenty of writing here that frankly should exist in real life, such as Alan Partridge’s autobiography. Have a look at the infographic below, and let us know in the comments which of these books you’d most like to read, and which

JB