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Explore The Sprawl Of “Breaking Bad” In A Supercut Of The Show’s Wide Shots

Breaking Bad really was to other TV shows what Walter White’s blue meth was to boring old regular meth.

Explore The Sprawl Of “Breaking Bad” In A Supercut Of The Show’s Wide Shots

Breaking Bad is a little more than two years gone from our televisions now, but the depths of the show continue to be mined by fans and enthusiasts who want to explore its various aesthetics–whether that be through the art of coffee shop design or the art of Ralph Steadman, or by poring through the easter eggs hidden throughout the series. Two years on, and there still isn’t really anything on television that does what Breaking Bad did–narratively, depth-of-character-wise, or visually.

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Film editor Jorge Luengo Ruiz–who also cut together a video essay noting the way the show aped some of Tarantino’s most famous visual moments during its run–has assembled a supercut celebrating an element of the unparalleled (at least on television) visual language that Breaking Bad. Ruiz focuses on the wide shots that made the show look unlike almost anything on TV. As cinematographer Michael Slovis noted, these style of shots are referred to within the industry as “Breaking Bad wide shots” now, and their effectiveness–at depicting isolation, at capturing how remote some of the setting was, or at building the impossible tension that the show thrived on–can’t be overstated. When thinking back on exactly how Breaking Bad managed to be so great, it’s worth keeping in mind that the visual tone was as big a part of the storytelling as Bryan Cranston’s performance and all of the “yeah, bitch!” exclamations that are remembered so fondly.

About the author

Dan Solomon lives in Austin with his wife and his dog. He's written about music for MTV and Spin, sports for Sports Illustrated, and pop culture for Vulture and the AV Club.

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