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The Real Story Behind The Dildo Selfie Stick

A vibrating social experiment on oversharing culture and modern media.

The Real Story Behind The Dildo Selfie Stick

Blame it on the Selfie Spoon. Cinnamon Toast Crunch launched the promo in September, and it quickly gained the attention of the world’s media. It also got Michael Krivicka thinking. Was it be possible to come up with something even more ridiculous and still get that much attention?

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If you haven’t already, meet the Dildo Selfie Stick. The ultimate embodiment of all our worst and weirdest digital social culture habits rolled into a convenient multitasking tool. Launched on October 5, it too got coverage from all around the world. Krivicka, a cofounder of agency Thinkmodo–the minds behind things like the Devil Baby and demon attack viral stunts for movie marketers–came up with this as a personal project that he self-funded.

“What amazed me about the Selfie Spoon wasn’t just the simplicity of the idea, but also how much coverage it got online and on TV,” says Krivicka. “Even the Today show covered it. I just thought it was the stupidest thing I’d ever seen, then challenged myself to come up with something even more ridiculous.”

Provided ad for Dildo Selfie Stick

His first idea was a toothbrush selfie stick, then it was a toilet plunger selfie stick, but in the end, he decided on a sex toy. He put up a quick casting call on Facebook through his actor friends, and even shot the video in his own apartment. Then he put up a splash webpage for it, and created a Twitter account, just to add another layer of mystery.

“I immediately got responses from news sites, sex shops, and others wondering where they could get one,” says Krivicka. “Very quickly, it got picked up and spread across the Internet. And it just shows how we as a society are obsessed with oversharing even the smallest details of our lives. I was curious if people would actually be interested in something like this, both as a consumer and in terms of media coverage. I really didn’t expect to see it go as far as it did.”

It’s not the first time Krivicka has turned a personal project into global attention. In 2009, he created an ad for a fake iPhone app called Nude It. His experience crafting marketing stunts for brand clients informed his decision to make the video a very familiar 30 seconds, as well as not show any nudity or anything too distasteful to make sure it could be shared as much as possible.

“I also wanted to prove you could take a simple idea, make it happen very quickly, and still achieve a global impact,” says Krivicka.

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The Dildo Selfie Stick site now confirms it as a fake, and lets all the curious would-be exhibitionists know that Krivicka wholeheartedly disapproves.

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About the author

Jeff Beer is a staff editor at Fast Company, covering advertising, marketing, and brand creativity. He lives in Toronto.

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