advertisement
advertisement
advertisement

Lucozade, The Original Energy Drink, Focuses On “Flow” In Big New Campaign

At almost 90 years old, Lucozade is undergoing a major brand revamp.

Lucozade, the preferred soft drink of Brits with a hangover, has unveiled a new advertising campaign that is intended to completely change people’s perceptions of the brand.

advertisement
advertisement

The campaign, entitled “Find Your Flow” created by agency Grey London, seeks to position the brand as an “ally” to busy people and not a jarring, quick-hit, energy shot.

Central to the push is a 60-second TV spot, which shows people smoothly over-performing in a range of tasks, taking increasingly challenging (and bizarre) situations in their stride.

The film is supported by extensive outdoor executions including a takeover of the subways around London’s Oxford Circus where there will be “flow lanes” and “slow lanes.” Alongside this there will also be radio, digital, experiential, social and PR activity. The brand says it is spending £14 million on the campaign, claiming it is its biggest-ever.

The current market is a challenging one for Lucozade. First launched in 1927 it has altered brand positioning before in response to the changing times and attitudes. Originally it was sold in glass bottles, which were wrapped in crinkly cellophane and was mainly stocked by pharmacies. It was very much seen as a drink for those recovering from illnesses. Intended as a palatable glucose-based drink for children with say, flu, its strapline was “Lucozade aids recovery.”

Then in the 1980s, in the wake of falling sales, it dropped the pseudo-medical messaging and was positioned as a drink to replace lost energy and targeted the sports drink category. Using well-known sports stars in its advertising it saw huge success during this era and launched numerous variants.

While it remains a successful brand, especially in its core market, the U.K., it is not an “energy” drink in the same way Red Bull and other caffeinated brands are energy drinks despite being sold alongside them. Furthermore, drinks with high sugar content are currently under a critical spotlight and recently, its sister brand Ribena was among a number of sugary drinks that U.K. supermarket chain Tesco announced were going to be axed from its shelves in a bid to fight childhood obesity.

advertisement

This new strategic direction comes just under two years after Lucozade and Ribena were sold by long-term owners GlaxoSmithKline to Suntory for £1.35 billion.

advertisement
advertisement

About the author

Louise Jack is a London-based journalist, writer and editor with a background in advertising and marketing. She has written for several titles including Marketing Week, Campaign and The Independent.

More