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Tradr Is Like Tinder–But For Selling Your Old Junk

Technically, Tinder is also for selling your junk. But this app is about getting rid of your stuff.

Do you have a house full of “antiques” that you’re feeling overburdened by? Perhaps you can get some sucker–er, some collector–to come and take them off your hands, without even resorting to an awkward Craigslist post. Tradr is an app for selling off your old junk or your beautiful hand-made craft items. Think of it as an app-ified version of eBay or Craigslist, only way easier to use. Instead of struggling with photo uploads and multiple pages, with Tradr you can snap a picture, add a description and place an ad, all while you pre-spend the proceeds on a fancy lattucino.

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Person-to-person classifieds have been around forever, but it has never been as easy to buy and sell as it is with an app. And there are plenty of other options around the world. Because the ‘network effect’ causes users tend to cluster around a service that others already use, one service tends to grow in a country or city. In Spain it’s Wallapop. In Berlin, Germany it’s Shpock.

Tradr has a gimmick, though, that its creators–Jessica Behrens and Zaki Djemal–hope will make it even easier to use. Users are presented with a successive photos of items on offer. They swipe right if they like it, left if they don’t, which is the model used by Tinder. This easy winnowing of offers makes decision-taking much easier, without the agonizing over choices that usually comes with comparison shopping.

Like other marketplace apps, Tradr also makes it easy for buyer to contact seller and ask questions, and of course you get all the usual location-based search features so you really can shop locally.

The Tradr team is based in the U.S. and Brazil, and–incredibly–has 12 people working on it already. The user base is around 12,000 so far, with a growth rate of 90% in the last week. An Android app is due in September. Behrens and Djemal plan to make the service more community-based, with the ability to follow other users and build groups.

Buying second-hand isn’t just a good way to save money. It’s also great for the environment, simultaneously keeping one item out of the landfill, while preventing the sale of another newly-manufactured object. And the convenience is key. When you first sign up to one of these services, your first instinct will be to snap pictures of all the cast-offs you have around the house and list them. That instinct, along with hyper-local sales and its Tinder-inspired interface, should make Tradr a success.

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About the author

Previously found writing at Wired.com, Cult of Mac and Straight No filter.

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