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Watch 50 of Your Favorite Movie Car Chases Edited Into 6 Minutes of Seamless Carnage

A new supercut edits 50 of the most memorable movie car chases into one seamless collection of evasion, collision, and probable body work.

Watch 50 of Your Favorite Movie Car Chases Edited Into 6 Minutes of Seamless Carnage

The Matrix Reloaded is not a great film. This opinion is subjective, and some may dispute it, but time has not been very kind to the other aspects of The Matrix trilogy that are not The Matrix. However, there is greatness within The Matrix Reloaded. Well over an hour into the film, there is a glorious 14-minute car chase that is absolutely unforgettable. That’s the power of a loud, chaotic, immaculately choreographed car chase–it can transcend the celluloid surrounding it, and become an art form unto itself. Or at least that’s the working theory of a new supercut called The Art of the Chase.

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Assembled by the movie podcast blog Filmnørdens Hjørne, it’s a montage of 50 memorable movie car chases, edited into a seamless whole. The video is arranged by sequence so that the first minute is all prep work–fastening seat belts, synchronizing watches, and donning of driving gloves, all of which signify that shit is about to get real. Then there’s a collection of peeling out moments, complete with fishtailing and u-turns, and we’re quite literally off to the races.

Beginning with The Bourne Identity, the clip spans a wide variety of genres and eras. There are car chase movies, other kinds of movies that happen to feature car chases, and movies that sound like car chase movies but only have like one car chase. (That last one would be Drive.) Classics like The French Connection and The Blues Brothers sit alongside more surprising recent fare like Nightcrawler and Captain America: Winter Soldier.

“The most time consuming part of the process is finding and preparing the clips,” the creator writes on the blog’s Vimeo page. “The fun part is editing them together in new and interesting ways. This is also the most frustrating part, because the possibilities are almost endless and if you’re not careful, the project will simply get stuck in the mud, so to speak.”

Watch another video from Filmnørdens Hjørne, The Art of The Opening Scene, below:

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