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Microsoft Will Remove Revenge Porn From Search Results

Microsoft Will Remove Revenge Porn From Search Results
[Photo: Flickr user Marcel Oosterwijk]

Microsoft is keeping up with the Joneses: In a blog post Wednesday, the company declared it would start honoring requests to remove nude photos and videos shared online without the subject’s permission–known as revenge porn–from Bing search results, following in the footsteps of a number of tech giants that recently announced similar policies.

In addition to scrubbing photos and videos from Bing, Microsoft will block access to the content in question from OneDrive and Xbox Live. A new reporting page will give victims more open lines of communication through which they can request that links be taken down.

Microsoft notes that the new measures cannot, unfortunately, reverse the fact that the content is still out there, floating in the ether:

Clearly, this reporting mechanism is but one small step in a growing and much-needed effort across the public and private sectors to address the problem. It’s important to remember, for example, that removing links in search results to content hosted elsewhere online doesn’t actually remove the content from the Internet–victims still need stronger protections across the Web and around the world.

This year alone, a host of companies have agreed to ban revenge porn when requested, including Facebook, Google, Reddit, and Twitter. Earlier this week, Twitter introduced a safety center to better equip its users to address harassment and online safety issues when they arise.

[via Washington Post]

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