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This Lovely Spliced Tableware Uses Asymmetry To Enhance Functionality

If you were to glance quickly at Ian Anderson’s collection of stacked and shifted ceramic tablewares, you might think that they had been dropped and glued carelessly back together.

“I wanted to explore the idea of alternative tableware forms, and demonstrate that function isn’t necessarily dependent on the number of qualities a form shares with the most basic utilitarian pieces,” Anderson writes in an email. So he took the traditional forms and split, sliced, shifted or warped them. “Deconstructing is a very literal but effective way of showing this.”

The results are lovely geometric pieces that have a distinct functional advantage as well. His oden pitcher ($130), for example, is cut in such a way that the space between the two spliced halves negates the need for a handle. “The pitcher’s form is actually easier to hold after it has been deconstructed,” says Anderson. Same goes for the oswald mugs ($48): the shifted sides make a nice little nook for the drinker’s hand.

Anderson rounds out the collection with geometric-handled mugs and bowls with melted rims. To make all of the pieces, he uses a process called slip-casting, which involves making a plaster mold, casting each piece with liquid clay and then glazing them.

Bottoms…out?

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