advertisement
advertisement
advertisement

Iconic Big Type Postcards Make Small-Town America Alluring

Summer’s in full swing and there’s still time to squeeze in a trip or two. How about Butte, Montana? Or Newark, Ohio? At first glance, they don’t seem like obvious vacation destinations, but after spying Curt Teich’s instantly charming—and recognizable—postcards you may think twice.

The printing company, which opened in Chicago in 1898, produced thousands of postcards until it closed in 1978. Its most iconic designs are the big-letter cards, which featured bold letterforms with photographs of local attractions and landmarks inside of them. The cards were all designed by hand and relied on submitted images. Most were printed with a five-color process on linen-finish paper.

Many of the company’s archives are part of the Lake County Discovery Museum and are viewable through the Illinois Digital Archive. Some of the entries are so detailed that you can see production notes, hand-drawn sketches, the individual photographs that were stitched together for montages, and more. It’s no wonder that these were treasured items to receive in the mail.

Correction: The Curt Teich Postcard Archives are housed at Lake County Discovery Museum, not the Forest Museum, as the post incorrectly stated in a previous version.

advertisement
advertisement