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A Comedian’s Fake Customer Service Account On Facebook Serves Up Next-Level Trolling

Comedian Ben Palmer has been trolling the entitled by responding to ridiculous complaints on corporate Facebook pages as “Customer Service.”

A Comedian’s Fake Customer Service Account On Facebook Serves Up Next-Level Trolling
[Customer Service Agent: Goodluz via Shutterstock]

It can be difficult to hold onto your sense of humor when dealing with a customer service rep. The feeling of righteous indignation metastasizes with any hurdle this supposed guardian of your best interests presents, turning the entire exchange adversarial. We often forget how relatively petty our grievances are. One comedian, however, is keeping customer service-seeking malcontents in check on Facebook, and it’s hilarious.

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Fake customer service on social media is nothing new. The greatest, most intricate customer service prank of all time , for instance. What Atlanta-based comedian Ben Palmer is doing on Facebook right now is different. Palmer targets the most entitled, prickly complaints on the Facebook pages of certain brands, and then swoops in like a mischievous angel, leaving sick burns in his wake. With the Facebook handle “Customer Service,” and a stock photo avatar of a woman wearing a headset, Palmer bluntly responds to the most unwarranted parts of each complaint, and tops it off with a snarky “Hope this helps.” It probably doesn’t help the customer very much, but it helps observers have a laugh when they visit Palmer’s site, where he posts screenshots of his interactions.


Palmer originally started trolling brand-page complainers for fun with his Customer Service partner Nick Price, without any dedicated page to deposit the interactions. Eventually, the two created We Hope That Helps following an outpouring of positive feedback.

“A lot of people who work in customer service and have to deal with rude people all day come to our page get kind of a release from it and tell us we made their day,” Palmer tells Co.Create. “Anyone who gets a laugh out of it because they’ve dealt with it directly or they’ve just been around an unruly customer–those are the people that inspired us to do this.”

As one might imagine, those who’ve been burned on We Hope That Helps are not as grateful for the recognition. Fortunately, they tend to respond with the same burning anger and poor syntax used against the companies that ‘wronged’ them. One such response is the head image on Palmer’s site: “A warning to this page. You need to shut down this page. Posing as a something your not for the purpose of trolling and self ‘humor’ is down right wrong and illegal. I am not a normal person, I have connections in Legal services that will pretty sure not agree with what you’re doing. I demand now to shut down your site, and its sick humor. Thank you all and have a great day.”

Have a look at some of Palmer’s other great interactions in the slides above.

[via Dangerous Minds]

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