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This Touching Film For Kissing Day Shows People Kissing We Don’t Typically See Kissing In Films

This Touching Film For Kissing Day Shows People Kissing We Don’t Typically See Kissing In Films

The rather depressing statistic that just 7% of people have been on a date with, or asked out, a disabled person is part of the insight behind this heart-warming spot from U.K. charity Scope.

The 80-second film, “Kiss” was created by agency Grey London to celebrate International Kissing Day (today! x) and is part of an overarching campaign, “End the Awkward.” Set to Antony and the Johnsons’ track Kiss My Name, the joyful film, directed by Nabil, shows several disabled people kissing their partners.

Ollie Hancock, born with the lower part of his right arm missing, gets to grips with partner Jen Shersby, visually impaired Dianne Noella movingly touches Anthony Pike’s face before locking lips and wheelchair-bound Michael Buckley welcomes wife Claire onto his lap for a passionate snog.

Scope says that because not enough people interact with disabled people, the result is few people know how to behave when they do. This, in turn, results in them panicking or simply avoiding situations because they are scared of doing or saying the wrong thing. Research by the charity shows more than three-quarters of British people feel awkward around disabled people.


The End the Awkward campaign is aimed at breaking down some of those barriers. Last year the charity ran a series of fun spots playing out awkward scenarios, such as: “I’ve bent down to a wheelchair user, now what?”, “Is this another rejection or is she deaf?” and “How do I shake a hand that isn’t there?” A webpage also provides helpful, practical tips for a range of situations.

Scope hopes that by smashing up a few misconceptions or assumptions, people might think more about how to include disabled people in their lives or at the very least, not be terrified by the prospect. Happy kissing!

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