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The Next Generation Of Ad Creativity: See The Winners Of The Future Lions

Five student teams were honored for creating clever, innovative work for the likes of Google, Uber, and Snapchat.

Now in its 10th year, the Future Lions competition at the Cannes Festival of Creativity challenges advertising students to come up with ways to forge a connection between global brands and audiences.

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Presented by AKQA in partnership with Google, the competition’s parameters are pretty loose—the students can focus on a brand of their choice, with no requirements regarding the type of media or technology used. But entrants do have to explore new realms, reaching their target audience in ways that weren’t possible three years ago.


The creative thinkers behind this year’s five winning entries aimed to do just that, aspiring to go beyond mere marketing to do some good in the world. To wit: One team, designating Google as the client and aiming to bring technology to people without reliable electricity, created the chromebook_Type. The laptop is equipped with keys that provide energy to run the device every time they are tapped via embedded Piezo-Electric nanogenerators.

Another team, envisioning Heineken as its client, created a micropchip dubbed SafeStamp that temporarily adheres to the skin and measures blood alcohol levels, warning wearers if they reach the legal driving limit by glowing a blue tint.


For Uber, a team looked to capitalize on the car service’s vast presence in major cities and created UberFIRST-AID, which turns Uber drivers into first responders, giving them first-aid training and first-aid kits, and empowering 911 to reach out to the nearest Uber car in the event of an emergency so drivers can provide basic care until EMTs arrive.

Another team developed Snaphelp for Snapchat, to seamlessly and privately link kids who need help with issues like bullying, with psychiatrists and child therapists who are willing to talk to them through the mobile app.


Out to create a link between humans and nature, a team produced an app dubbed Treeprint for World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF). Using iPhone’s fingerprint sensors and a tree ring database, people can find out the tree ring that mostly closely resembles their own fingerprint, get more detailed information about that particular tree, and easily make a donation to WWF using their Apple ID.

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In addition to the five finalists, picked from more than 1,800 students in 60 countries who entered the competition, Sweden’s Berghs School of Communication, was named Future Lions “School of the Year” for the second consecutive year.

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About the author

Christine Champagne is a New York City-based journalist best known for covering creativity in television and film, interviewing the talent in front of the camera and behind-the-scenes. She has written for outlets including Emmy, Variety, VanityFair.com, Redbook, Time Out New York and TVSquad.com

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