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From Anderson To Tarkovsky, Here Are What The Imaginary Houses Of Famous Film Directors Look Like

For is latest series, Italian illustrator Frederico Babina designs the fictional houses of 27 famous film directors.

Some directors are so defined by the aesthetic of their films that it’s hard to believe they don’t inhabit the fantastical worlds they create on screen. It’s nice to imagine Wes Anderson coming home after a long shoot to a house as enchanting and whimsical as one of his meticulously-designed film sets. Or Ridley Scott tossing back a scotch in one of the towering futuristic skyscrapers in Bladerunner.

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In his latest illustration series, ‘Archidirector,’ Barcelona-based artist Federico Babina plays into those fantasies by imagining the homes of 27 famous film directors. From George Lucas’s space station pad to the surreal, carnival-esq abode of Federico Fellini, the houses depicted in Babina’s retro-inspired illustrations reflect each director’s distinctive cinematic style.


As a cinephile and architect, Babina has merged cinema and architecture in his illustrations before: in his Archicine series he depicts the iconic buildings that appear in beloved movies, and in Archiset he illustrates film’s most recognizable interior spaces.

Previously, Babina was illustrating architecture that already existed. But with Archidirector Babina gave himself full creative license to both illustrate and design the fictional houses of directors like David Lynch, Stanley Kubrick and Lars Van Trier. In an email interview, Babina said Archidirector more abstract exercise than his past architecture/cinema mash-ups. “It was challenging to translate the atmosphere of cinema into small illustrated architecture,” Babina said.

In some houses, it’s easy to spot architectural elements that allude to a specific film or a director’s personality. In others, it’s more of an overall atmosphere. The house of Andrei Tarkovsky, for example–whose films, like Solaris and Stalker, are known for their metaphysical themes–is a modernist structure behind an old stone facade. Babina said he wanted to create a house “between the sacred and the profane, classic and modern at the same time.”

Others, like Tim Burton’s creepy Victorian mansion, need considerably less explanation. But then, we already knew that Burton’s house embodies all of the gothic weirdness of his films.

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About the author

Meg Miller is an associate editor at Co.Design covering art, technology, and design.

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