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Charles Correa, One of India’s Greatest Architects, Dies At 84

The Mumbai-based architect Charles Correa has passed away according to a BBC report. He was 84.

Born in Mumbai in 1930, Correa was a champion of a vernacular, regional brand of architecture whose structures entered into a dialog with the surrounding city, culture, and environment. “The work of Charles Correa Associates seeks new and eloquent ways to express the cultures in which we live,” states his firm’s website.

Image: via Charles Correa Associates

Correa earned his Masters of Architecture degree from MIT, and over the course of his career, designed museums, hotels, public buildings, commercial spaces, single- and multi-family residential projects, and monuments. While his work can be found in countries around the globe—his most recent projects include the Ismaili Center, in Toronto, and the Brain Science Center on the MIT campus—Correa is known for leaving an indelible mark in India, designing the Gandhi Memorial in Gujarat, the Kala Academy in Goa, and the Bharat Bhavan art center in Bhopal, among many others.

Over the course of his career, Correa received numerous awards including a RIBA Gold Medal and the Aga Khan Award for Architecture. He also authored numerous essays, many of which were ahead of their time.

In one particular text, Correa wrote that “a good architect does not have to be fazed by working under severe economic constrains, however drastic they might be,” he wrote in the mid 1980s. “Having perforce to use only the humblest materials, such as mud or sun-dried adobe bricks, need not prevent him from creating a joyous and triumphal piece of architecture.”

[via BBC]

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