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Your Risk Of Disease May Depend On When You Were Born

Your Risk Of Disease May Depend On When You Were Born

Here’s a piece of health news that won’t surprise astrology believers: the time of year you were born can predict the health risks you’ll face later in life. Or so suggests a new study from Columbia University Department of Medicine, which examined the medical records of and incredible 1.7 million patients for a link between birth month and likelihood of disease.

Researchers combed through 1,688 different diseases and found 55 that corresponded to birth month, including asthma, reproductive performance, eyesight and ADHD. The results of their study, published by Oxford University Press, are are mapped visually here (in a way not dissimilar from Zodiac chart, tbh).

Columbia University Department of Medicine

According to the data, fall babies are the ones with the worst luck when it comes to health. Those born between September and November run the highest risk for the most diseases, namely ADHD, viral infections and asthma. People with winter birthdays–January through March–round a close second: they’re the most at risk of developing heart disease later on.

Though researchers warn that the data could be skewed since it was only collected in NYC, the findings make sense when you consider other studies done in this area. As other data has shown, fall babies are likely more asthma-prone because they are born into dust mite season. And as for those born in winter, lower levels of vitamin D at birth could provide the link to heart disease.

So what’s the healthiest time of year to be born? The sunny months May through August didn’t correlate strongly with any particular disease. As if they weren’t already smug enough, people with summer birthdays now have another reason to gloat.

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