advertisement
advertisement

The Recommender: Diana Budds, Former Alto Sax Star

The best things on and off the Internet this week, curated by Fast Company employees.

The Recommender: Diana Budds, Former Alto Sax Star
[Photo: Flickr user Diego Lazo]
Diana BuddsPhoto: Celine Grouard for Fast Company

Name: Diana Budds
Role at Fast Company: Senior editor, Co.Design. I write stories about design and architecture, which is pretty amazing since I learn something new every day.
Twitter: @DianaBudds
Titillating Fact: Nothing all that “titillating.” So how about something potentially embarrassing instead? I played the alto sax from fifth grade up until college.

advertisement

Things she’s loving:

1. Raymond Chandler AND Criminal: My first recommendation is a two-for-one special. I’ve been reading Raymond Chandler lately. No one writes a one-liner or a description quite like he does. (For example, this passage from The Long Goodbye: “The coffee was overtrained and the sandwich was as full of rich flavor as a piece torn off an old shirt.” Flowery, yes, but there’s no mistaking what he means.) I’ve also been listening to this amazing podcast called Criminal. The show tells stories about people “who’ve done wrong, been wronged, or gotten caught somewhere in the middle.” (The artwork on the site is also pretty cool.) There’s a great crossover between the two in the episode called “The Big Sleep.” Two superfans in their 70s wrote themselves into Chandler’s history by solving a mystery of his. I won’t say more, you’ll just have to listen.

2. A’s Pitcher, Pat Venditte: The Oakland A’s haven’t been all that hot this year, but they have a secret weapon in their ambidextrous switch pitcher Pat Venditte. “Game changer” gets thrown around a lot these days but he really is one. Major League Baseball had to create special rules for how he pitches–he can’t change arms during an at bat. Also, a newspaper mistakenly called him “amphibious,” which made for a pretty good laugh.

3. Payphones: This is one of my favorite accounts to follow on Instagram. The photographer doesn’t post that often, but the images are consistently stunning. I love how these technological relics still exist in the wild.