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Watch Artists Distort The Facts, Beautifully, In This Thoughtful Campaign About News Credibility

Watch Artists Distort The Facts, Beautifully, In This Thoughtful Campaign About News Credibility

In 1993, the late Kevin Carter took a shocking photo of a starving child being watched, ominously, by a vulture in Sudan. The shot won the Pulitzer Prize and now, 20 years later, is being used to make a case for people to consider the source of their news.

In a new ad campaign, Brazil’s largest news agency VEJA, and agency AlmapBBDO, gathered six different artists to play a visual game of Broken Telephone to show how something can be distorted when told through too many sources.


Carter’s photograph was first used as a reference by painter Rien for a canvas. The original photo was then covered and the next artist, illustrator Eduardo Nunes, used Rien’s painting as a reference to create an illustration, which then served as an inspiration for sculptor Cícero D’Ávila, followed by graffiti artist Giuliano Alemão, woodcut artist Samuel Ornellas and then photographer Guto Nóbrega. The first photo and Nóbrega’s final work couldn’t be more different.

It’s an artful swipe at the never-ending supply and dubious provenance of Internet “news,” and the fact you could probably find an article on unicorn hunting online if you looked long enough.

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