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What New College Graduates Wish You Would Say About Finding A Job

You’re likely saying all the wrong things to new college graduates.

What New College Graduates Wish You Would Say About Finding A Job
[Photo: Flickr user Jackie.lck]

It can’t be easy watching your beloved, talented, educated money-pit child walk off that graduation stage, diploma in hand . . . and move back home with no job prospects. Last summer when I graduated with a couple of freelance jobs but was looking for something full-time, I was lucky that my parents mostly employed the strategy they had been using with me since the fourth grade: “She’s got it.” They were always supportive but never pestered me about what progress I had made that day, where I was applying, who I had reached out to, because they knew I was on top it. And guess what? Their trust in me gave me much more confidence in my job search than constant nagging would have.

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Any expert and anyone who has been there can tell you that self-esteem is the thing that takes the biggest hit during unemployment. Trust me, your kids are just as eager to find a job as you are for them to have one. They know you’ve just spent thousands of dollars on their education, and (I hope) they are endlessly grateful. They desperately want to have an answer to the question: “Where are you working?” Social media is there with unrelenting reminders of what isn’t true but certainly feels like it is: “EVERYONE HAS A JOB EXCEPT YOU, LOSER.”

In short, they’re downright terrified. (For confirmation on that, just read this piece I wrote last year, “Fears Of A New Graduate”). From talking to many friends who have been through this difficult situation with their parents in the past year, here is some friendly advice for being there for your child in a productive way during the job search.

1. Don’t Micromanage.

You know your kid, and maybe he or she is someone who needs an extra push to get things done. But either way, trying to micromanage your adult child’s career is ill-advised. I just read a truly horrifying anecdote in Aliza Licht’s new book Leave Your Mark about an insistent mother who called DKNY repeatedly seeking a job for her daughter.

She literally sent an email with the subject line: “A Job For My Daughter.” While I doubt that most parents reach that degree of desperation (God, I hope), it is an extreme illustration of the difficulty in watching your college graduate look for a job, and your natural desire to help in any way possible. Don’t go down that path. At this point, the kids are officially raised–you have to trust they’re equipped to find a job on their own.

2. Trust Their Unconventional Choices.

Just last week, I wrote about nine successful millennials who did something after graduation other than start a full-time job. Your child’s career path might not look like you expected it to. In fact, it almost certainly won’t, given the rapidly changing job market.

One of my friends said one of the things he appreciated most about his parents was that they never questioned his unusual career choices: in particular, one summer when he took an internship at Sesame Street. This may have seemed crazy at the time, but the internship turned out to be an eye-opening experience that motivated him to go to law school. The paths to success are many, and multiplying every day.

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3. Be Realistic In Your Expectations.

When that same friend found himself applying to law schools two years later, his dad insisted that he apply to all of the Ivy Leagues, despite my friend explaining that his GPA was below the threshold they even considered. Not very productive. This goes double for your sons and daughters seeking jobs right now.

Sure, it’s getting better, but it’s tough out there. You can’t expect them to send applications one week, have an interview the next, and be sitting down at their new desk the week after that. Asking “have you heard anything yet?” every day will only make them frustrated and demoralized. You also can’t expect them to be searching for a job eight hours a day–yes, finding a job is a full-time job, but other goals or even social events can be equally essential.

4. Don’t Throw Their Financial Status In Their Faces.

I’m not in a position to tell anyone how to parent, but I am in a position to determine whether someone is being an asshole. If you agreed to let your child live in your house and they are obeying the terms of that agreement, it is unfair and wrong to throw that fact back in their face if they are clearly making an effort to find a job. Yes, they live in your house again and you’re allowed to impose whatever rules you see fit. You can make them do the dishes every day, shovel the driveway, hand wash your unmentionables, whatever. But using “well, you’re living here for free!” as an angry or passive-aggressive jab is not only cruel but insanely counter-productive. (Pro tip: Making someone feel like a loser is not conducive to that person rocking an interview and landing a job).

5. Don’t Make Comparisons To “When I Graduated.”

“When I graduated I had four six-figure offers” . . . aaand stop right there. You’re different people, you have different paths in life. But even if your child is in the exact same profession as you, that comparison is flat out untenable. Most millennials graduated during the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression, and this year’s graduates are still feeling its effects. During our Great Recession, the unemployment rate for those over 34 peaked at about 8%, but unemployment between the ages of 18 and 34 peaked at 14% in 2010 and remains elevated. According to Pew Research, we are the first generation ever to have higher levels of student-loan debt, poverty, and unemployment, and lower levels of wealth and personal income than their two immediate predecessor generations had at the same age. We all know it’s not the same, so don’t make the mistake of acting like it is.

6. Support them, Love Them . . .

. . . in the same way you’ve been doing for the past 22 years. Thanks for that, by the way. I hope that I speak for my generation when I say that we appreciate it more than you know.

This article originally appeared on Levo and is reprinted with permission.

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